Bl. John triumphed. From that day the University of Paris took up the same cause to defend this privilege of the Blessed Virgin Mary. Bl. John Duns Scotus had to leave the University of Paris one more time, partly for some political reasons and partly because some doubts had been cast on his theology by opponents. The Franciscan Minister General sent Scotus to Cologne, Germany, where he lectured for some time in the Franciscan house of studies until his untimely death on November 8, 1308, barely 43 years of age. He was called "blessed" almost immediately after his death. Through the centuries his tomb has been visited by large numbers of the faithful and public veneration has been offered to him in the dioceses of Edinburgh, Scotland, Nola, Italy, and Cologne, Germany, as well as throughout the Order of Friars Minor (the Franciscans). In 1854, Pope Pius IX solemnly declared that the Marian doctrine of Bl. John was a correct expression of the faith of the Apostles: "at the first moment of Her conception, Mary was preserved free from the stain of original sin, in view of the merits of Jesus Christ." The seal of the Church's approval was also placed on Bl. John's doctrine on the universal primacy of Christ when the feast of Christ the King was instituted in 1925. On March 20, 1993, Bl. John Duns Scotus was beatified by Pope John Paul II at St. Peter's Basilica in Rome." />

Blessed John Duns Scotus - November 7